Day 5 - Self-Forgiveness Isn't Hard


I forgive myself for accepting and allowing myself to fall into inaction and so put off doing my self-forgiveness writings because I perceive it as hard work.


Picture from flickr

I forgive myself for thinking and feeling like writing is hard work.

I forgive myself for not accepting and allowing myself to direct myself through the writing of my self-forgiveness statements, here as breath, as life.

I forgive the fact that I haven't allowed myself or given myself the chance to really work hard at this process, and to have created the belief that it is difficult when I haven't even given it a real shot.

I forgive myself for procrastinating that which I perceive as hard and/or foreign in some regard.

I forgive myself for accepting and allowing myself to wait for more knowledge and answers from someone or somewhere outside of me before I begin the task.

I forgive myself for accepting and allowing myself to not give myself the chance to prove to myself that this process is merely a matter of directing myself every time.

I forgive myself that I have accepted and allowed me as a mind to procrastinate/lag/delay/postpone "undesirable" tasks/actions.

I forgive myself for accepting and allowing myself to define specific actions as undesirable when the reality of the situation is that I desire to be lazy.

I forgive myself that I have accepted and allowed myself to like being lazy.

I forgive myself for being lazy.         

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I commit myself to push myself through the inclination to take the easy way out, which often manifests as laziness.

I commit myself to a mode of non-procrastination.

I commit myself as one and equal with my breath to recognizing when I am about to allow myself to go into the mental indulgence of being lazy.

I commit myself to share myself publicly through these writings in a timely manner so that I may present myself effectively and clearly.

I commit myself to realizing when I simply allow myself to define something as undesirable and/or difficult, and through this realization direct myself within and as my breath.

I commit myself to trying to do the work of which I define as difficult (or a variant thereof), only to realize that in "trying" I am moving myself and actually doing the work.

I forgive myself for labeling the verb "to try" as weak and ineffective. 

I commit myself to not define possible actions as too difficult, and rather just start.